Health

According to the World Health Organization, health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of infirmity. A healthy community as described by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2010 report is one that continuously creates and improves both its physical and social environments, helping people to support one another in aspects of daily life and to develop to their fullest potential.

Healthy places are those designed and built to improve the quality of life for all people and where everyone is free to make choices amid a variety of healthy, available, accessible, and affordable options.

Businesses need to understand the link between poor health, lost productivity and the bottom line. For example, three missed days out of 30 workdays is a 10 percent loss of productivity.

Employers look at three things when determining the basic cost of health insurance: the health of a population, absenteeism and productivity.

Smoking and obesity cost Escambia and Santa Rosa employers $800 million in 2013, says David Sjoberg, who heads the Partnership for a Healthy Community.

Escambia County Health Department data shows that 18 percent of our students are obese based on their body mass index and another 16 percent are considered overweight. In Santa Rosa County, 30 percent of students are considered obese or overweight.

Healthy eating is more expensive, something that cannot be discounted in an area with traditionally low wages.

Health

Company brings free medical, dental, vision clinic to Pensacola

A company that offers free dental, vision and medical services expects to serve 1,000 people during a Pensacola event in early December. Read full story

Health

New study examines public health effects of 2014 Escambia County flood

Some ZIP codes saw increased hospitalizations and emergency room visits connected to the flood, others saw decrease, study finds. Read full story

Health

PSC Warrington campus offers dental health help to public

Pensacola State's Warrington campus offers screenings, teeth cleaning, x-rays, fluoride treatments and sealants at low cost to the public. Read full story

Health

Sacred Heart hosts back to school health fair July 30

Sacred Heart will offer a back to school health fair on July 30 that will include screenings, school physicals and immunizations. Read full story

Health

UWF professor appointed to state Early Steps panel

Dr. Sara Evans, an assistant professor at the University of West Florida, was named to a state agency that advises the Early Steps program, which helps children with developmental delays get early intervention. Read full story

Health

Changes possible to Medicaid dental program

A House panel Tuesday approved a bill that could lead to revamping children's dental care in the Medicaid program. Read full story

Health

Senate panel backs expanding prescribing powers

Bill would allow physician assistants, nurse practitioners to expand ability to write prescriptions. Read full story

Health

Shannon’s Window: Keeping the uninsured caught in the safety net

If you don’t have health insurance, try not to sick — for at least three to five more years. Read full story

Health

Don Gaetz says expanding health care is dead

State Sen Don Gaetz says expansion of health care to Floridians who don't have it is likely dead for three to five years. At least. Read full story

Health

Grant will help those who help mistreated children

A $60,000 grant will help provide training for those who help Pensacola area children removed from the home due to mistreatment. Read full story

Health

Shannon’s Window: An investment we can live with

Helping people make better health choices isn't only good for the waistline — it's good business' bottom line. Read full story

Public health

Researchers looking at disparity in infant mortality

UWF researches aim to find out why minority infants twice as likely to die before age 1 as white babies

In Escambia County, minorities are more than twice as likely to die before first birthday; UWF researchers hope to learn why. Read full story